Aphesis

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Paidion
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Aphesis

Post by Paidion » Sun Aug 08, 2021 10:59 am

Greek lexicons given the following as the primary definition of the Greek noun
"αφεσις" ("aphesis", using English alphabetic characters):

859 αφεσις (aphesis) deliverance, freedom from, release from bondage, remission (disappearance of the signs and symptoms of)

The following verse is a clear example in which the noun is used in this way:

Lu 4:18 "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty (859) to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty (859)those who are oppressed...”


What would you say to someone who insisted that the word Greek word “αφεσις” means “forgiveness”? In the passage above, would it be appropriate to proclaim forgiveness to the captives? They don't need “forgiveness”; they need “liberty.” They need “deliverance” from their bondage. And those who are oppressed don't need “forgiveness”; they need deliverance from oppression.

Yet, virtually all translations render the word “forgiveness” when applied to sins.
There are 16 cases in which this is done, the following 8 cases are quoted from the NASB:

Mt 26:28 for this is My blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for forgiveness <859> of sins.
Mr 1:4 John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness <859> of sins.
Mr 3:29 but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness <859>, but is guilty of an eternal sin"—
Lu 1:77 To give to His people the knowledge of salvation By the forgiveness <859> of their sins,
Ac 2:38 Peter said to them, "Repent, and each of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness <859> of your sins; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.
Ac 13:38 "Therefore let it be known to you, brethren, that through Him forgiveness <859> of sins is proclaimed to you,
Eph 1:7 In Him we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness <859> of our trespasses, according to the riches of His grace
Heb 9:22 And according to the Law, one may almost say, all things are cleansed with blood, and without shedding of blood there is no forgiveness <859>.


Once again, we don't need mere forgiveness from sin; we need deliverance from sin, so that we are no longer in bondage to sin. (To “sin” is to do that which is harmful to other people or to ourselves).

Jesus didn't die so that our sin could be forgiven, but so that our sin could be forsaken.

It seems to me that fallen human beings love their sins, and don't want to be delivered from them. They just want to be forgiven every time they sin, so that they can keep on sinning without having to suffer the consequences of their wrong doing.
Paidion

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dwight92070
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Re: Aphesis

Post by dwight92070 » Mon Aug 09, 2021 8:26 am

Good point. However, just as we have a part in our salvation - repentance, so we have a part in our deliverance, or our ongoing resistance of sin. Remember Jesus told the healed man, "Do not sin any more, so that nothing worse happens to you." John 5:14 So Jesus assumed that the man had the ability to resist sin. James assumed the same thing in Acts 15:29, Paul also in 2 Thessalonians 3:6 and 1 Timothy 5:22, James in James 1:27, Peter in 1 Peter 2:12 and there's more. We are to keep ourselves from sin, while at the same time expecting His assistance when we do so.
However, if one is demon-possessed, I would think that only God can deliver them from that, or someone who can cast the demon out in Jesus name. After that deliverance, it is largely up to them to decide to stay away from sin.

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Paidion
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Re: Aphesis

Post by Paidion » Mon Aug 09, 2021 1:33 pm

Yes indeed, we have a part in our deliverance from sin. Our part is to be willing to be delivered. We must CHOOSE to be delivered.
But without the enabling grace of Christ, made available by His sacrifice on our behalf, we are seldom successful in overcoming sin.
Paidion

Man judges a person by his past deeds, and administers penalties for his wrongdoing. God judges a person by his present character, and disciplines him that he may become righteous.

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Homer
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Re: Aphesis

Post by Homer » Wed Aug 11, 2021 10:51 am

Paidion,

You wrote:
859 αφεσις (aphesis) deliverance, freedom from, release from bondage, remission (disappearance of the signs and symptoms of)

The following verse is a clear example in which the noun is used in this way:

Lu 4:18 "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty (859) to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty (859)those who are oppressed...”

What would you say to someone who insisted that the word Greek word “αφεσις” means “forgiveness”? In the passage above, would it be appropriate to proclaim forgiveness to the captives? They don't need “forgiveness”; they need “liberty.” They need “deliverance” from their bondage. And those who are oppressed don't need “forgiveness”; they need deliverance from oppression.
I do not question that aphesis can mean liberty/deliverance. And surely you will concede that words can have a range of meaning.

Your claim is that aphesis does not mean "forgive" but rather provides an enabling that relates to future action, i.e. so we will not sin (or sin less) in the future - that is, unless I misunderstand you. Yet Jesus tells us (using a form of the same word) we must forgive others:

Matthew 6:14
New American Standard Bible 1995
14. For if you forgive (Grk. aphete) others for their transgressions, your heavenly Father will also forgive (Grk aphesei) you.

How would our forgiving them have a future enabling effect on them? Does it not rather have to do with past misdeeds? How are we to release someone from sins already committed other than by forgiving them? We are informed in the scriptures many times that we must forgive others, and the forms of aphesis used in the parable in Matthew 18:21-35 clearly show that "forgive" is a correct translation of the word, as it is a great majority of times in the scriptures.

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Paidion
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Re: Aphesis

Post by Paidion » Wed Aug 11, 2021 3:22 pm

No, the word that is used in Matthew 6:14 is NOT another form of the same word. IT IS A DIFFERENT WORD.
If it were another form of the same word, it would have the same Strong's number. However, it has a different Strong's number.

The word used in Matthew 6:14 is "αφιημι" or "aphiāmi" (Strong's 863) which, in the nominal form means "forgiveness".
But the word which I stated as meaning "deliverance" is "αφεσις" or "aphesis (Strong's 859).

TWO DIFFERENT WORDS!
Paidion

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Homer
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Re: Aphesis

Post by Homer » Sun Aug 22, 2021 4:10 pm

Paidion,

I noticed that you never answered my following questions:
Your claim is that aphesis does not mean "forgive" but rather provides an enabling that relates to future action, i.e. so we will not sin (or sin less) in the future - that is, unless I misunderstand you. Yet Jesus tells us (using a form of the same word) we must forgive others:

Matthew 6:14
New American Standard Bible 1995
14. For if you forgive (Grk. aphete) others for their transgressions, your heavenly Father will also forgive (Grk aphesei) you.

How would our forgiving them have a future enabling effect on them? Does it not rather have to do with past misdeeds? How are we to release someone from sins already committed other than by forgiving them? We are informed in the scriptures many times that we must forgive others, and the forms of aphesis used in the parable in Matthew 18:21-35 clearly show that "forgive" is a correct translation of the word, as it is a great majority of times in the scriptures.
Perhaps "form" of the same word is not the best way to express it, but surely you know that the noun aphesis is derived from the verb ahiemi, and theological dictionaries give virtually the same definition of both words. In Kittle and the TDNT they are both covered under the same article. And aion and aionios also are related but have separate numbers in Strongs.

In regard to aphesis the Greek Zodhiates states that the noun aphesis, from the verb aphiemi, means forgiveness, remission from both the guilt and power of sin.

You have only half of the Gospel.

Be blessed!

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Paidion
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Re: Aphesis

Post by Paidion » Mon Aug 23, 2021 10:34 am

Homer wrote:I noticed that you never answered my following questions:
Your claim is that aphesis does not mean "forgive" but rather provides an enabling that relates to future action, i.e. so we will not sin (or sin less) in the future - that is, unless I misunderstand you. Yet Jesus tells us (using a form of the same word) we must forgive others:

Matthew 6:14
New American Standard Bible 1995
14. For if you forgive (Grk. aphete) others for their transgressions, your heavenly Father will also forgive (Grk aphesei) you.

How would our forgiving them have a future enabling effect on them? Does it not rather have to do with past misdeeds? How are we to release someone from sins already committed other than by forgiving them? We are informed in the scriptures many times that we must forgive others, and the forms of aphesis used in the parable in Matthew 18:21-35 clearly show that "forgive" is a correct translation of the word, as it is a great majority of times in the scriptures.


Perhaps "form" of the same word is not the best way to express it, but surely you know that the noun aphesis is derived from the verb ahiemi, and theological dictionaries give virtually the same definition of both words. In Kittle and the TDNT they are both covered under the same article. And aion and aionios also are related but have separate numbers in Strongs.

In regard to aphesis the Greek Zodhiates states that the noun aphesis, from the verb aphiemi, means forgiveness, remission from both the guilt and power of sin.
I thought I HAD answered your questions by distinguishing between the noun αφιημι (aphiāmi) which means "forgive" (though it also has other meanings such as "leave" or "permit") and αφεσις (aphesis) which means "deliverance".

You claim that "aphesis" (Strongs 859) means "forgiveness".
Consider "aphesis" as having that meaning in Luke 4:18 .

He has sent me to proclaim forgiveness to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, and to set at forgiveness those who are oppressed.

The captives do not need forgiveness; they need deliverance from captivity. Those who are oppressed do not forgiveness; they need deliverance from oppression. And every translation renders the word as "deliverance" in this verse.

Rather αφιημι (aphiāmi) is the word for "forgiveness".

And since he could not pay, his master ordered him to be sold, with his wife and children and all that he had, and payment to be made.
So the servant fell on his knees, imploring him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ And out of pity for him, the master of that servant released him and forgave him the debt. (Matthew 18:25-27)

No. The Greek word for "forgiveness" is αφιημι (aphiāmi).
αφεσις (aphesis) means "deliverance".
Paidion

Man judges a person by his past deeds, and administers penalties for his wrongdoing. God judges a person by his present character, and disciplines him that he may become righteous.

Avatar shows me at 75 years old. I am now 83.

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