Thinking of kids

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jarrod
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Thinking of kids

Post by jarrod » Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:55 am

I think one thing the state schools do positively for kids that attend is try to expose them to the different areas of learning: math, sciences, history, english, etc. I definitely think this is _one of the things_ children and young adults need when they are growing up. The problem is that I don't believe any government will be able to provide the Spirit along the way. Does it happen though? Do children receive the good news of the Lord in public schools? Of course they do, but I believe that is because His servants are also present in those schools (faculty, students, etc).

I believe praying that they would come to know God and bringing children up in the Way they should go is of foremost importance. While that is occurring though, I feel it is also important to expose them to as many areas of life (deemed necessary/capable) to see where they "naturally" gravitate towards and that the Lord can use in their life. Then, upon finding those, really foster and nourish the growth in that with much prayer and petition because a worldly worldview can creep in at any time.

I don't have children... I pray the Lord would grant them... it just hasn't happened yet. So, this may be obvious to most, but I thought I would share what I am thinking about.

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mattrose
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by mattrose » Thu Sep 13, 2012 2:33 pm

jarrod wrote:I think one thing the state schools do positively for kids that attend is try to expose them to the different areas of learning: math, sciences, history, english, etc. I definitely think this is _one of the things_ children and young adults need when they are growing up. The problem is that I don't believe any government will be able to provide the Spirit along the way. Does it happen though? Do children receive the good news of the Lord in public schools? Of course they do, but I believe that is because His servants are also present in those schools (faculty, students, etc).

I believe praying that they would come to know God and bringing children up in the Way they should go is of foremost importance. While that is occurring though, I feel it is also important to expose them to as many areas of life (deemed necessary/capable) to see where they "naturally" gravitate towards and that the Lord can use in their life. Then, upon finding those, really foster and nourish the growth in that with much prayer and petition because a worldly worldview can creep in at any time.

I don't have children... I pray the Lord would grant them... it just hasn't happened yet. So, this may be obvious to most, but I thought I would share what I am thinking about.
I have 2 little girls (a 2 year old and a 5 month old), so I have been thinking some about our plans for their formal education. My wife and I are certainly considering homeschooling. We feel there'd be a better guarantee of a 'good' education that way actually. Plus, there'd be less worldliness is our home than our daughters would encounter in public school. On the other hand, I often wonder about what the choice to homeschool says about our love for the world. What if all Christian children were pulled out of public school? Who would be the 'witness' for these other children?

I myself am leaning toward public school for our children. I think this puts more pressure on my wife and I to do our absolute best at parenting, but I trust that with God's help we can do a good job and give our girls a good opportunity to be lights for Jesus in school. My wife, however, is still leaning toward homeschooling them... so it could get interesting :)

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jarrod
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by jarrod » Thu Sep 13, 2012 2:44 pm

mattrose wrote:I have 2 little girls (a 2 year old and a 5 month old), so I have been thinking some about our plans for their formal education. My wife and I are certainly considering homeschooling. We feel there'd be a better guarantee of a 'good' education that way actually. Plus, there'd be less worldliness is our home than our daughters would encounter in public school. On the other hand, I often wonder about what the choice to homeschool says about our love for the world. What if all Christian children were pulled out of public school? Who would be the 'witness' for these other children?

I myself am leaning toward public school for our children. I think this puts more pressure on my wife and I to do our absolute best at parenting, but I trust that with God's help we can do a good job and give our girls a good opportunity to be lights for Jesus in school. My wife, however, is still leaning toward homeschooling them... so it could get interesting :)
Not having kids, I can only "speculate" what I would do. I remember telling someone one time (who had 3 kids) that I would take 5!! He said I should probably work my way up lol. :)

I think for my family, I would want to homeschool. That's not something I think is an absolute issue (I have heard some that suggest it as such), but I see some really negative effects from kids attending public schools. I hear you about trusting in the Lord to assist and I don't doubt He will nor that He does right now. My desire would be for my wife and I to "raise" our child fulltime... it seems it would be our responsibility anyway. I also think part of our "homeschool" teaching would include reaching out to advance the Kingdom through their peers. I foresee Kingdom kids being friends with their neighbors (that go to public schools) and even seeking out the public school mission field.

Thanks for leading me down new roads of thought :)

Jarod

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Perry
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by Perry » Thu Sep 13, 2012 10:55 pm

I eagerly await Candlepower's contribution to this thread.

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psimmond
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by psimmond » Fri Sep 14, 2012 8:36 pm

I taught 8 years at a public school where several staff members were Christians. We were told by our administrator not to talk about religious beliefs because some of the parents were fiercely opposed to their children being "brainwashed." I always told my students I was a Christian and tried to plant seeds by walking in a manner worthy of my high calling.

Right now, my kids attend an expensive Christian school where the teachers are dedicated to teaching God's truth along with the other core subjects. In the future, circumstances may cause us to move and I'm considering placing my kids in a public school because I may not have the money to keep them in a private school setting.

I like the idea of Christian school or homeschool but I realize these options aren't available for everyone and I think public school can be ok--I graduated from a public school. I also think that Christian school or homeschool during the elementary years (K-5) might be a great way to establish a good foundation before sending kids into a public school.

I think we need to be very careful in sending our kids to a public school so they can be salt and light. There are a lot of negative influences out there and salt can lose its saltiness.
Let me boldly state the obvious. If you are not sure whether you heard directly from God, you didn’t.
~Garry Friesen

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darinhouston
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by darinhouston » Fri Sep 14, 2012 10:13 pm

We have a hybrid program at a private Christian classical "university model" school (you'll have to google "university model"). We have two schoolhouse days and two homeschool days on the same very classical (and pretty robust) curriculum at home and school. I don't think it's wise to expect young kids to be salt and light until they are solid in their faith and have been trained by us to endure the situation. I feel it's leading lambs to slaughter, apart from the negative influences they're likely to have before they're ready for them. For us, it's a good mix -- I don't think we have the stamina or "legs" due to our age etc. (or stress of curriculum choices etc) for full homeshooling, and I think this gives some good socialization and athletic programs. This year (1st grade) stepped it up a lot and they're doing music and art and chinese, spanish and greek (age level appropriate, of course) -- it's amazing what they can memorize and absorb at this age, but it's H-A-R-D on us.

schoel
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by schoel » Fri Mar 01, 2013 1:51 pm

I've not understood the "missionary" reason for Christians placing their children in public schools. My wife and I teach our 5 children at home.

Children below 16 year of age, tend towards high levels of peer pressure and absorption of outside influence. They are not fully developed, nor have they completely internalized their core beliefs. They have a lot of maturing and growing to do. As I see it, a child isn't ready to face the pressures, temptations and lies that are a part of a normal public school experience, without being heavily influenced by them. While I may plan to work hard at countering these negative affects, it would seem that I'm prematurely exposing my children to influences for which they aren't ready.

It would seem highly preferable to choose a lifestyle where a Godly parents have the most time and influence over their children as they grow up.

As for "salt and light" in the public schools, adults would be much better equipped to carry the light where there are so many negative influences. Even so, many Christians who have taught or worked in the public schools will describe how limited their voice for Christ is.

While I don't agree with every sentiment expressed in these, they make many a good point:
http://indoctrinationmovie.com/
http://exodusmandate.org/
*************************************

As an aside, another issue I have with placing my children in public schools has to do with the source of the funds. People in my county are forcibly taxed to pay for the public education system, but the responsibility to educate my children is mine, per God. Isn't it immoral to force others to subsidize a responsibility that is mine alone?

When I educate my children with other people's money because I don't think I can afford to homeschool or send them to a private school, it is a statement that while God provided me with these children, he hasn't adequately provided for their education. Therefore, I need to force others (steal) to contribute financially in order to educate them.

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psimmond
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by psimmond » Fri Mar 01, 2013 9:19 pm

Hi Schoel,
I agree that it makes more sense for adults to enter public schools with the intention of being salt and light than sending children (especially young children) with this intention.

I do think home schooling and Christian schooling are both good options if they work for you. As you know, home schooling requires a certain temperament, as well as a great deal of time and knowledge, especially if you plan to teach your children from the time they are young until they are 16 or 17. And Christian schooling is often cost prohibitive.

I think your last paragraph is too strong. If I send my children to a public school, I'm not stealing from anyone. If you feel that the government is stealing by taking your taxes to fund a system of public education, you can contact your representatives or run for office to try to change the system. And if you think that the system will never change and paying tax for education really bothers you, you could search for a country that doesn't tax in this way and move there. (I'm not saying "If you don't like it, get out!" I'm simply saying that unlike North Koreans, we do have the ability to leave America; I've been living in China for the past 6 years.)
Let me boldly state the obvious. If you are not sure whether you heard directly from God, you didn’t.
~Garry Friesen

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darinhouston
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by darinhouston » Fri Mar 01, 2013 9:36 pm

psimmond wrote:Hi Schoel,

I do think home schooling and Christian schooling are both good options if they work for you. As you know, home schooling requires a certain temperament, as well as a great deal of time and knowledge, especially if you plan to teach your children from the time they are young until they are 16 or 17. And Christian schooling is often cost prohibitive.
I have to say from experience with many homeschoolers that there are EVERY (and I mean EVERY) temperament and knowledge level involved and doing it well (and some at the high end not doing it so well). You're right about time though -- I think what it takes more than anything is commitment and will. Modern homeschooling curricula and preparation time make it possible for any level of knowledge to do it. Temperament helps, but self-discipline and commitment are the key with any temperament. It's just plain hard but so far worth it for us. For some kids, it's actually easier. Our hybrid program doesn't really permit it, but being able to pace and schedule as family commitments and travel and child capabilities warrant on a per subject level is real freedom for those I know who do it full time. 12 month calendar provides for MUCH flexibility during the year to do other things or take a break or double up as needed.

I'm a big fan if you haven't noticed. Though life would DEFINITELY be easier if we sent them to public school, ease is clearly not what we have been called to.

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psimmond
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Re: Thinking of kids

Post by psimmond » Sat Mar 02, 2013 8:43 am

I guess when I talk about temperament, I'm thinking of my temperament and my wife's and our failed attempt to homeschool our daughter in 2006. :lol: We moved to China sure that we were going to start homeschooling when we hit the ground, but we soon got tired of listening to our daughter's constant whining and sent her to the international school. She likes it there (although she hates the homework) and she's a straight A student.

I think homeschooling is great, but I can't imagine homeschooling all the way through. When I help my daughter with her homework, I first have to flip back 4-5 pages in her textbook to relearn the stuff I learned so many years ago so I can help her. I would hate to have to relearn chemistry or advanced math to teach it to my kids. I hated those subjects in high school and college and I've happily forgotten all about the periodic table and algebraic formulas! :D

Even with good curicula, most students still need a teacher with a good understanding of the subject matter as well as the ability to teach it. I know some homeschoolers pool their resources and talents so the parents teach in the areas of their strengths--maybe I'd send my kids to the neighbor for math and science and she'd send them to me for English and history.
Let me boldly state the obvious. If you are not sure whether you heard directly from God, you didn’t.
~Garry Friesen

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